Eating disorders and psychotherapy

Eating disorders and psychotherapy


If you’re experiencing eat problems its never
too early to talk about them. And I think people don’t have to wait until they have
a diagnosis, you don’t have to be ill to have therapy. I think everyone can benefit from
therapy, and having a space to talk and having a therapeutic relationship with somebody. My name is James and I’ve had experiences
with eating problems since my mid teens. I initially had a lot of worries around my weight
and my shape and lots of different factors that came together to make me start to control
my food and use the food as a way of coping with difficult emotions. I really struggled to get support because
I found that I was pushed from one service to another and that everybody was really concerned,
quite rightly, with my physical health and the risk that that posed. But underneath that
I think there was a level of distress where I was really not happy and had emotions that
were unexplored. That wasn’t being addressed. Psychotherapy was the start of a really long
journey for me towards overcoming and coming to terms with issues that I hadn’t addressed.
I think the relationship and the quality of the relationship I’ve had with the therapists
that I’ve seen has been so important because if I didn’t trust them then I would never
have started to open up. I think that therapy was something that took me a long time to come to because I didn’t think I was worth it, but having gone through the experience
I think that it is something that everyone is entitled to and everyone is entitled to
have a safe space where they can talk about anything that they like. I think that it is really important to remember
that risk is really a big issue and that if you are in danger in your physical health
and your mental state then getting support that you need is really important. The eating problems are so much more than
just the food and the weight and the shape and actually psychotherapy for me was so refreshing
to be able to talk about issues that weren’t food. And not just to be seen in that way.
I’d recommend anybody to try psychotherapy, even if it doesn’t work for them just to try
with an open mind, thinking about maybe some of the broader issues that are driving the
problem and rather than looking for a quick fix.

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