Michael Shaps Wineworks | Seafood Thermidor | Beef Ragout with Pappardelle

Michael Shaps Wineworks | Seafood Thermidor | Beef Ragout with Pappardelle


>>From the Burgundy
region of France to all points north, south,
east, and west in Virginia, Michael Shaps knows his wine. Hi, I’m Tassie Pippert
and today on Un-Wine’d I’m in the beautiful
Albemarle County of Virginia at Michael Shaps’ Wineworks, where we’ll taste
some delectable and beautifully balanced wines. So, curl up on that
sofa, grab that glass. It’s time to unwind. (jazz music) (jazz music) I’m here in the tank room
at Michael Shaps’ Wineworks and, Michael, thank you so
much for having us here.>>My pleasure.
>>This is an amazing place and
I am just astounded with the number of tanks,
the number of barrels. You are just some wine master. (laughter) And thank you so much
for having us here. This is really cool.>>Well, I’m happy to have you.>>Yeah, so as I stand
here in the tank room, I know a lot about making wine, but I don’t know enough
about making wine. What goes into these tanks?>>Well, right now
everything is aging. During the– during the harvest, we’re, uh, this is
kind of a crazy scene with wine fermenting,
red wine fermenters, we have white wine fermenter.>>Wow.>>Uh, so a little
bit of everything and right now everything that’s
not aging in the oak barrels are aging in tanks
getting ready for blending and then bottling.>>Okay, cool. Well, tell us a little
about your story and how you got
started making wine here in Albemarle
County, Virginia.>>Uh, wow, originally
I was the winemaker at Jefferson Vineyards
from ’95-2000 and then I went out on my own, started my own brand
with the King Family and made their wines and my
wine and started consulting. And yeah since 2000, I’ve been able to work with a lot of startup wineries
and existing wineries, helping them on
their wine quality and it’s been a lot of fun
to see the industry grow.>>Amazing, so did you start
off in the wine industry or did you start off
doing something else?>>Uh, studied
business in college and then, you know,
after college wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted to do. Went to Boston, I was
managing a restaurant there and, which was really
way ahead of it’s time in terms of wine program
back in the mid-late ’80s, and eventually got put in charge of the wine program and
really had to learn quickly. Tasting and studying, I
just got fascinated by wine and decided I really wanted
to learn how to make wine.>>That’s cool.>>And so I packed my bags
and went to Burgundy, which I just love Burgundy wines and I just figures, “why not?”>>Yeah, well there always
that, “I got you moment” when the wine industry
just kind of sucks us in, isn’t there?
>>Yup.>>So that probably
that wine list–>>Yup.>>That restaurant.>>Tasting great wines
from all over the world.>>Well, and then you came here and I know that you’ve brought
a lot of interns from France and from other
countries here to work. And thank you for that
because, you know, we’ve really seen that
influence of France, through you, through those
other folks, grow in Virginia and that’s been beautiful.>>Yeah, no, when I arrived
in ’95 there wasn’t a lot of local cellar
workers available. And I, um, was able to
bring over some interns and help with the
production where I was. And then, eventually,
other wineries. It was a great way
as a consultant, put someone in place who
knew what I wanted to do and could do it and then
be able to work with them. And a lot of them end
up staying, becoming
head winemakers. And a lot of them went
back and I still have a lot of contacts in several
countries where interns that worked for me, we
really stay in touch and I get to go visit them
and it’s a lot of fun.>>That’s cool. And you still make
wine in France.>>Yes.>>Mhmm, that is really neat.>>Yes, that’s a lot of fun. To be able to go back
and make wine in Burgundy and where it all started for me. So it’s, uh, it’s
really been special.>>Well, and you’re making
wines from a lot of areas in Virginia and a lot
of different varietals. So, there’s so many
different wine profiles that you’re creating. How many wineries
do you work with?>>We have about 17 clients
that we make wine for, besides our own brand and
we have grapes coming from, you know, southwest
Virginia up to, you know, Laughton County, Northern
Neck, the Valley, so it’s fun. It’s interesting to see,
we’ll have a Pinot Gris from down southwest
Virginia and a Pinot Gris from the Northern Neck
and they’re, you know, styles are different,
the customers are looking for a different type
of wine and so it’s fun to be able to work with
many different vineyards and many different varieties and then also a lot
of the same varieties.>>Oh yeah. Well it seems like a lot
of places I go, I’ll say, “Well who’s your winemaker? I love this wine.” “Well, that’s Michael Shaps” Well, so I couldn’t
wait to come meet you. This is just
really, really neat. Now, I know that
you’ve had a lot to do with the recent history
of Virginia wine, what do you think is in
store for our future?>>Oh gosh, I think
it’s unlimited. We’re still learning
quite a bit.>>Trying new varietals,
new locations, and I think there’s no
set rules in Virginia and I look forward to
planting some new varieties that we haven’t seen in the
state, in Shenandoah Valley. I just think we’re still–
there’s always room to grow and to learn. So, we’re just kind of
scratching the surface as far as I’m concerned.>>That’s great, and
you are planting in the Shenandoah Valley because you have recently purchased–>>Yup.>>Shenandoah-
>>Shenandoah Valley>>That’s awesome
>>Shenandoah, it’s the second oldest
active winery in the state, founded in 1976 and
there’s some really nice old vines there, but
we’re also re-planting part of the vineyards and
looking to expand in that area. It’s some great soil, it’s
a great climate, driest, one of the driest
counties in the state, you know, which is good. we don’t want too much rainfall during the harvest season. So yeah, it’s got
a lot of potential.>>That is great, awesome. Well , I’m anxious to
taste your wines here.>>Great, why not?>>Okay, Let’s do it.
(Laughter) (jazz music) (cork pops)>>Well Michael, we have
some amazing wines here we’re going to try and I
am excited about trying this Chardonnay and this
Petit Manseng to begin.>>Sure, all right,>>All right.>>So we have a Chardonnay, this is a single
vineyard Chardonnay. It’s a vineyard in
Laughton County. I’ve been making Chardonnay
from this vineyard, we’ve been leasing
it now for 11 years, and up until the point
I found this vineyard I didn’t make any Chardonnay
under my own brand because I couldn’t
find the quality that I really wanted
for Chardonnay. I’m kind of spoiled, you know, I make white Burgundy
and Chardonnay and Burgundy’s a little
different than here. But this vineyard, which is
about 2 hours north of us in Laughton County,
ripens later in September where it’s a little bit cooler
at night, cooler at day time>>Yeah.>>So it has a little more
natural acidity, more balanced. It’s also a lot of lighter soils and these are Dijon
clones of Chardonnay and all together it has
been a fantastic vineyard that I’ve been excited about
now for all these years.>>So I make it the same
way we make my Morso, it’s these all non-inoculated. We don’t add any yeast strain, we ferment it more
traditionally in a natural way and it’s barrel
fermented in french oak.>>Oh, awesome. Mmm, that is beautiful.>>Thank you.>>Mmm, very nice.>>It’s crisp, it’s ah–>>Yes, it’s balanced we
look for the nice balance between the acidity and
the impact of the oak. These wines, this vineyard,
this Wild Meadow Vineyard, has really aged
nicely over the years. We’ve been able to make more
of a traditional Chardonnay that’s improves for 3-5 years, that’s not necessarily something that you need to
drink right away. And this is the
current release, 2015.>>Wow.>>So it’s just really starting
to evolve and open up.>>And then the Petit Manseng, I love a good Petit Manseng.>>This is the just
release, 2016. This is from grapes here in,
grown around Charlottesville. We have a vineyard
that we lease, Honah Lee Vineyard
in Gordonsville. This also has some fruit
from another vineyard in the Keswick area. Yeah, I started making
dry Petit Manseng in 2012 and I think this is really one
of our best grape varieties in Virginia for our
region, our climate. And it’s nice to be able
to make a dry style. It’s very challenging
to do that, but we do some unique
things with this. We soak it on the
skins for a while. It’s barrel fermented. It does not go through a
secondary malactic fermentation. But it’s really, aromatically,
it’s pretty intense with a lot of pineapple notes and it’s barrel fermented
in about 1/3 new oak. So you get some of that impact
of the char and the toast. You almost get a little bit
of a grilled pineapple–>>Yeah, I’m getting that.
>>that characteristic.>>It’s really nice. But it has great acidity,
great volume length and this is also, I
think, a white wine that’s built to, you
know, age some time.>>Oh, yeah. So when you’re pairing
your Chardonnay and your Petit Manseng, what are some of your favorite
flavors to have with those.>>Oh gosh, well the
Petit Manseng is unique. I think that can go
with a wide range. Anything from curries
to, you know, shellfish. They can stand up to, you know, bright foods with
some good acidity and it’s kind of because
of the weight too, it can handle creamier
dishes as well, where the Chardonnay,
more classic Chardonnay, dishes with any kind
of butter or cream, or poultry or heavier seafood.>>Yeah, oh man.>>And then, we
have the L. Scott.>>All right.>>And this is a wine I
started making in 2012. It’s a Tannat based wine, and Tannat being a
very heavy tannic with good acidity
variety that’s from the Madiran region in
southwestern France, which is very similar to the
conditions here in Virginia. I wanted to make something
a little mote subtle, that was a blend because we
do make a varietal Tannat which is really
structured and tannic and needs a lot of time. I wanted something a
little more elegant and complex and so we blend
Merlot and Malbec in this. So it’s a base of Tannat
with Merlot, Malbec, and then some years we do
a little bit of Cabernet or a little Petit Verdot
to kind of round it out as well if we need to.>>Softens it a little bit, yeah.>>And this is the current
release, which is 2014. These wines, the wines are
aged 2 years in french oak and about 50% of it
is new french oak.>>Oh, that is really nice.>>Well, thanks.>>Mhmm, mmm. It’s nice, I’m thinking of
my braised short ribs –>>Ah, perfect.
>>or something like that.>>That would be perfect.>>Oh yeah. It’s just been amazing and
I’ve enjoyed every minute.>>Well, great.>>Thank you so much.>>Well, thanks for coming.>>All right. (upbeat jazz) This Michael Shaps’ Chardonnay
is so buttery and delicious. The first thing I thought
about serving with this, with it, was a seafood dish
and I love this seafood dish. Have you ever had
Lobster Thermidor and it’s just so
rich and wonderful? Well, I took that
Lobster Thermidor recipe and I created a
Seafood Thermidor that hopefully
you’ll really enjoy. So right now, I’ve got
some shrimp, some scallops, and some lobster
that I’ve pre-cooked, and I’m going to make my sauce in this nice little sauce pan. So I’ve got about a
cup of heavy cream and to that, I’m going
to add two egg yolks. Now when I make a
sauce like this, here’s my secret. I really like to use
extra large egg yolks, because I think they make
a nicer custard sauce. So I use two extra
large egg yolks in this. There we go. We’re just going to
stir that through. Now you don’t want the egg yolks to start cooking separately. You don’t want those
little yellow bits to form. So it’s important that
you stir frequently. And what I’m going to
do, is just kind of whisk that occasionally. In this pan beside it, I’ve
got some mushrooms browning. And that’s about eight
ounces of mushrooms in three tablespoons of butter. And I really want them to
get a nice brown on them. It just makes for a better
sauce and a much richer dish. There we go. So those are almost
ready for me. Now, I’m going to
chop up the seafood. I just want it in bite sized
pieces, nothing too big. So with the shrimp, oh about half inch to
an inch cuts on those. And you don’t want to
overcook the seafood because you’re going to
put this all in a broiler and it will continue to
cook just a little bit in the broiler with
the topping on it, so you don’t want
to overcook it. That always damages seafood. So I can see that this
is starting to sizzle, it’s starting to
cook on the edges. That is beautiful. Now to this, I’m going
to add a little paprika, give it some color and I
want to add some dry mustard. Now, make sure when you
put your dry mustard in your dish to use, that
you break it up a little bit because you don’t want
a clump of dry mustard in this delicious dish,
it’ll make it bitter. All right, so I’m
going to let that cook just a little bit more. I’m going to turn
off those mushrooms and chop up the
rest of my seafood. Now for scallops, you want
to just quarter those. And for these, I only seared
them slightly on each side. They were probably in
my pan about a minute. (chopping) Okay, so my sauce
is nice and thick. I’m going to go ahead
and turn that off so it doesn’t burn
or clump on me. And I want to add just a
little bit of dry sherry. (gasps) That smell is awesome. (metal clinking) Mmm, wonderful. I love this sauce,
it’s just so delicious. Now, I’m going to take the
tails of two small lobsters and I’ll just chop
those, like the shrimp, in about one half
to one inch pieces. I want to take these mushrooms and put them right in my sauce. If there’s any residual butter, just kind of drain
that out a little bit. You don’t want that
greasiness in your sauce. And if the mushrooms
have not absorbed it all, you really don’t need it. And then I want to
add all of my seafood. This smells so
good, so delicious. Let’s put that in
a dish to bake. So I’ve got a little dish
here that I’ve just sprayed with some PAM Release
and this should make two servings this size. And now I want to make a
little topping to go on that. I’m going to take
some Panko breadcrumbs and some grated Gruyere cheese. Sometimes, I’ll use a Gruyere, sometimes, I’ll use a Parmesan. And then I want to take a
little bit of softened butter and I’m going to do
this with my fingers. So we’re just going to
mix all that together. We’re making a nice
little crumb top that will go overtop of
our Seafood Thermidor. Just mix that up nicely so you
don’t have too much butter. That’s another reason
why you don’t want all the butter
from the mushrooms. And if your mushrooms yield
a lot of butter at the end, you can also use
that melted butter instead of softened
butter in this. Let’s sprinkle a little
bit of that on top– to give a nice crunchy
topping on that. And we’re going to stick
that in the broiler for just a few minutes
until it gets nice and golden brown on the top. So after about five to six
minutes under the broiler, this is what that Seafood
Thermidor looks like. It is so delicious and I
know you’re going to love it with this Chardonnay. Again, a beautifully
buttery Chardonnay, so complex and delicious. So I hope you’ll enjoy this
recipe for Seafood Thermidor and this delicious Chardonnay. (upbeat jazz) I love this L. Scott. It’s a Tannat, Malbec,
and Merlot blend that is just beautiful
with red meat. So I’m making for you today
a little Ragu of Beef, with some pappardelle. Now I’ve got a pot boiling
with some pappardelle here and we’re going to turn
that into a delicious dish with this beef. So what I want to do
first is take some herbs. Now I have a little
garlic, a little onion, a little paprika
and cayenne blend, and then I have black
pepper and salt. So right now, I’m just
going to mix that up to a nice little rub and I have my meat nice and dry. This is three very
large short ribs. And I just want to
dip, just a little bit, all around in that
rub blend for each one and I’m going to put this in
a really hot, searing pan. (meat sizzles) Just like that. Now I want to make sure
that I use all of my rub, but it’s okay if all of it
doesn’t touch everything because these flavors are
going to meld together for about four and a
half hours in the oven. So even if there’s some left
on the pan, on the little dish, I always just sprinkle it in. Now to that, I want to
add a couple of shallots that I’ve quartered and a small
yellow onion I’ve quartered, and about six cloves
or so of garlic. I leave the garlic whole
because it’s going to cook down. And we’ll just drop those in, they’re going to sear
around just like the beef. And what I want to do is
sear that beef on all sides and then I’m going to add
some liquid to braise. Let’s just flip
that a little bit and you can see that its
getting nice and brown. It gets crystallized in there. It’s just gorgeous. (loud sizzling) It’s a little bit stuck. All right, so once the meat
has browned on all sides, than what we want to do is
add a little bit of red wine. About two cups of a
nice dry red wine. (loud sizzle) And to that, I’m
going to add a quart of a very strong beef stock. So that will be our
simmering liquid. Now beef stock generally
has a lot of salt in it and we put salt in our rub so
be careful not to over salt. As you reduce in liquid,
the salt does not reduce. So even though your
liquid is going down, your salt will be
pretty intense. So don’t add salt until
the end if you need it. Now that is going to braise
either on the cooktop or in the oven for about
four and a half hours. And I really like to
do mine in the oven. It’s much more conducive
to a nice, gentle cooking. So now what I want to do
is take my pappardelle and the papardelle is
cooked to an al dente. It’s a really nice texture and
I want to just turn that off. And I’m going to take
about a cup of frozen peas and put it in the
bottom of my colander. This is all the
cooking those peas need and this is just an
optional ingredient. I love it for color and
I love it for texture. So I’m going to take my
pappardelle and just drain it right over those peas. S0 about 20-40 minutes before
I’m finished with the pap– The braise, I want
to add some carrots. And just use some baby
carrots or make sure that you cut your
carrots at least in half so that they will cook through. So, oh about half pound
or so, and right here I have some ribs that
are already done. And what I want to
do with those is to take a couple of
forks and I’m just going to separate those out. Just pull, kind of
like a pulled pork. If you see any huge fatty
deposits, pull those away because you don’t want
those in your ragu. But just kind of separate
out, pull that apart. And I’ve already, actually,
drained this braising liquid so the cloves of garlic and
most of the pieces of onion and shallot are not
in there anymore. It just makes kind of
a muddy looking mess when you’re doing this dish. There we go. Now I want to put that
back on the cooktop and I’m going to turn that on so that I can thicken the
liquid just a little bit. (lighter clicks three times) There we go. So in my little dish here, I have a little bit of
cornstarch and a little water. If you don’t like a
cornstarch slurry, you can certainly make a
roux, but for time today I’m just going to do
this nice little slurry. I put my carrots in there, you can see that
those are braised down and they’re just
delicious in this. There we go, separate
all that we can. And I want to pour
in that cornstarch and I’m just going to let
that cook for a little bit. I’ll stir it through so
that it doesn’t clump and I want it to
get nice and thick. Kind of like a gravy,
but not quite that thick. Now as you’re braising,
if you start to see that all of your
liquid is going away, make sure that you put
in a little more water. It won’t hurt the taste at all. Again, you’ve got all that salt so it’s not going
to hurt a thing. It’s starting to
get nice and thick. Right there, ah beautiful. This is such a nice winter dish. It’s very, very filling and perfect for this wine. Now I want to just pour
that right over my noodles. Turn that off so it doesn’t burn and then I want to
toss those through. Mmm, gorgeous. This is just an amazing dish. I usually serve it with
just a little side salad. That’s all you need and
then it’s a nice full meal. So I’m going to take a plate
and I just want to mound up a beautiful serving
right in the middle. Make sure you’ve got
some of that meat, and those carrots, and
the delicious green peas so you have lot of color. There we go and we’ll just wipe
down the side of that plate with a nice wet paper towel. There we go. And then I want to serve this
with this beautiful L. Scott. This is such a nice wine. Again, it’s a Tannat grape
and you don’t get a lot of Tannat in Virginia. It tends to be a
very strong grape and this is mellowed down
a bit with the Malbec and the Merlot. Look at that gorgeous color. It is an incredible wine. So I hope you’ll enjoy
this beautiful beef ragu with papardelle and
this lovely L. Scott. For all of the recipes
from today’s show you can visit our website to get this delicious
Thai Pork Salad, this beautiful Ragu of
Beef with Pappardelle, and this delicious
Seafood Thermidor. All served with these incredible
wines from Michael Shaps. We hope you enjoyed
today’s show. Until next time,
grab that glass. It’s time to unwind. To check out the vineyards
and wineries I’ve visited, go to our website
vpm.org/unwined The website feature unique
vineyards and winemakers from previous
episodes of the show. And if you want to try
your hand at cooking, all the recipes are
available, from light fare to succulent deserts and
everything in between. And of course the wines
are paired with each. So sit back, relax,
grab that glass. It’s time to unwind. (upbeat jazz)

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