The Future of Seafood – Trailer

The Future of Seafood – Trailer


It is estimated there will be two billion
more people on the planet by mid-century. Growing enough food for this booming world
population without serious environmental impacts is one of the greatest challenges to face
humanity. The same way that we have been through the
Green Revolution, with aquaculture right now we’re going through the Blue Revolution. Consumer demand for seafood is on the rise,
as doctors tout its health benefits and developing nations can afford more costly sources of
protein. By the year 2030, we’re going to have to
produce an additional 30 million metric tons of seafood to feed the human population. At the same time, wild fish stocks are either
depleted, overfished, or stagnant at best. If we’re going to actually protect our oceans,
we have to make that transition from hunting-gathering to farming. It’s what we’ve done with all of our other
food production. To walk into a restaurant and order a steak
of a wild cow, that doesn’t exist anymore. The reality is we are farming just about everything
else that we’re consuming, so why not fish? We’re already farming more than half the
global seafood production. We’re farming more seafood than we are beef
globally, and it’s only going to continue. Because of their cold-blooded nature and the
fact that they don’t need to expend as much energy living in a buoyant environment, fish
require a lot less feed than land animals, decreasing the demand on Earth’s resources. Aquaculture is the most efficient form of
animal protein production. Whether we like it or not, aquaculture has
become mainstream. There’s people who are still thinking negatively
about aquaculture, but those are the dark ages. Habitat destruction, water pollution, disease,
and food safety scares, caused mainly by crammed nearshore aquaculture operations in Asia,
have given the industry a bad name. But experts say newer, more innovative ways
of farming the sea are the way of the future. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable
way is to move aquaculture operations offshore – where there is plenty of available space
and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems. We’re going to need to double the global
seafood supply in order to meet projected demand. And we think the only way to really do that
is to move farms into the open ocean where we have this vast environment that can support
that kind of growth. In terms of a sustainable place to raise fish,
the open ocean is fantastic. These offshore submersible cages are marvelous
pieces of underwater engineering. There is no doubt that those are the most
advanced aquaculture systems in the world. It is the future of seafood production. Without aquaculture, we’re not going to
have enough seafood to supply the world. What does the seafood of the future look like? How do we sustainably grow fish from farm
to fork?

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